A “shot in the arm” from artists of other mediums.

I read blogs from artists outside the medium of creating fiction and have found great tools given freely in their advice. It takes only a little mental tweaking to make it sound advice about writing as well.

The first comes from Dewitt Jones, a photographer who worked for National Geographic for many years. Check out his corporate videos on creativity if you ever need that boost of self-confidence and joy of writing.

Last night, I was having trouble finishing this column and decided to take a walk on the local golf course—just me and my pitching wedge. As I walked down the 2nd fairway, the light of the setting sun was almost blinding. I could barely look straight ahead, much less to my left toward that blinding ball. Then, another step, and the light went away. My head turned involuntarily. There, in the exact spot where I stood, the sun was momentarily blocked by the one lone tree on the fairway. What I beheld was magic. “Wow!” I gasped, on an inhale. And for a few moments, I just stared, lost in the connection.

If you hear a “Wow!” shoot!

Quote taken from Moments of Wow!

And my tweak? If you hear a “wow!” from a visual that pops into your head, the faint whisp of dialogue or the jolt of conflict of characters interacting in your mind–write!

The next comes from a comic artist Phil McAndrew.  He wrote an awesome post giving advice to young artists which I feel applies really well to aspiring authors. Go read it. Here’s one of the many quotes I liked and compliments the quote above as well.

My best work, the work that I get most excited about and that other people seem to enjoy and respond to the most, is usually stuff that I draw purely for fun. My big mental art breakthroughs usually happen when I’m mindlessly doodling. Sketchbooks are where you get to draw whatever you want and where ideas are born. Set aside a little time every day to doodle and explore. Draw for YOURSELF.

My tweak, of course: Write for YOURSELF. Write the stories YOU want to read. Write they stories that you MUST know the endings to. Write the stories that consume your waking thoughts and dance through your dreams.

Lastly, from a Forbes article on creativity:

Gregg Fraley suggests starting your creative journey by believing you are creative.

Believe it. Simply Believe You Are Creative. Your most basic beliefs drive how you think, your brain listens to the programming you put in via your thoughts, like punch cards on an old computer. If you keep feeding it the “I’m Creative” card, it starts acting like it. When we hit the wall seeking ideas, feed in the card “I’m going to think of something great,” or “I’ll have a great idea for this.” Even when your faith falters, as the songs says, Don’t Stop Believin, fake it until you make it — you will make it — make an active choice to be creative.

BELIEVE and CHOOSE to be creative and it will be so. BELIEVE you are a writer, and it will be so.
Twitter stream I find helpful. Cherry pick because there is LOTS of stuff here. (Creativity, Craft and Marketing advice, etc.)
Artists Road (a bookmark for myself to peruse during the dry spells)

What do YOU do to feed your creativity? How do you keep the juices flowing?

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